Archive


5 listings, approx. 0 hrs and 2 min of material



September 17, 2012
Anecdote, Confiding, Philadelphia,
25.93 seconds
328 Kenneth Finkel : The Ben Franklin Parkway connects two of the city's most celebrated landmarks, City Hall and the Art Museum, but it's always been a tricky commute. Temple University historian Kenneth Finkel blames a missing link left out of the original construction. Submitted by Elisabeth Perez-Luna.
3.48 in 29 votes
September 20, 2012
Observation, Pensive, Architecture,
27.02 seconds
480 Kenneth Finkel : Philadelphia's City Hall, built between 1871-1901, is the world's tallest masonry building. Historian Kenneth Finkel of Temple University says its unique marble facade obscures construction materials that are common across the rest of the city. Submitted by Elisabeth Perez-Luna.
3.47 in 19 votes
September 20, 2012
Observation, Confiding, Architecture,
29.98 seconds
481 Kenneth Finkel : The Ben Franklin Parkway, designed in 1917 to emulate the Champs-Elysees in Paris, cut across a large swath of the city, northwest of City Hall, displacing thousands of Philadelphians, says Temple University Professor of American Studies Kenneth Finkel. Submitted by Elisabeth Perez-Luna.
3.45 in 20 votes
September 20, 2012
Observation, Confiding, Architecture,
29.86 seconds
482 Kenneth Finkel : The Ben Franklin Parkway was an immense urban achievement in its day, and it helped bridge two eras in America's transportation history. According to Temple University's Kenneth Finkel, the parkway smoothed the way for the automobile era in Philadelphia. Submitted by Elisabeth Perez-Luna.
3.45 in 20 votes
September 17, 2012
Anecdote, Confiding, Philadelphia,
23.45 seconds
327 Kenneth Finkel : Up until the early 20th century, there were oyster bars on nearly every block of Philadelphia. But according to Temple historian Kenneth Finkel, the omnipresent oyster didn't just fill stomachs across the city – they helped build the city itself. Submitted by Elisabeth Perez-Luna.
3.43 in 28 votes
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